Malaysia already loses Singapore as a customer due to chicken export ban, says MP

Malaysia chicken export ban pushes Singapore to look for new suppliers

Malaysia. Kluang MP Wong Shu Qi stated that the decision to ban chicken export is a wrong decision since it caused Singapore to diversify its food sources.

Since 1 June, the Malaysian government banned the export of more than 3.6 million chickens to stabilise their market.

“We have lost a market. So, no matter whether we reopen or allow exports again, we have lost a customer,” said Wong in a Thursday parliamentary sitting.

Malaysian chicken farmers are now fearing losing access to the Singaporean market if their government does not reverse the chicken export ban.

Meanwhile, Malaysian Minister of Agriculture and Food Industries Ronald Kiandee responded that they plan to end the subsidies on chicken and egg farmers on 31 August. However, they will retain the chicken export ban until supplies stabilise.

“When conditions are stable all over the country, not just oversupply in a few locations, but all across the country, of course, the government will decide to allow exports,” he stated.

Furthermore, Malaysia currently has no plans of lifting the chicken export ban.

“For the time being, the restrictions on the export of live broiler chickens (commercial broiler) are still in effect, said Dr Kiandee.

“Any decisions to allow the re-export of live broilers (commercial broilers) will be decided by the government based on a study on the stock and production at the farm level,” he added.

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